Classic Mini converted to an EV with Nissan Leaf tech – standard 20 kWh battery, 113 km range; from RM146k – paultan.org

London Electric Cars (LEC) has announced a new conversion pack that turns the classic Mini into a fully electric car. The base 20 kWh model costs from £25,000 (RM146k), excluding local taxes, shipping and donor vehicle. That battery pack is good for a range of between 60 to 70 miles (96 km to 113 km).

The electric powertrain and drivetrain and taken from a pre-owned, first-generation Nissan Leaf, which LEC says is a more sustainable solution than mining and creating new materials for these conversions.

This not only makes the process more cost effective, but it is also most sustainable in terms of end-to-end vehicle life cycle impact. LEC said it also has plans to reuse computer hardware, harvest batteries from traction packs, and use additive manufacturing technologies for the production and engineering of these classic Mini conversions. Reuse, reduce and recycle, right?

With that, aspiring owners have the option to install a larger battery for more range, and the electric motor can be upgraded as well. Charging is done either through a Type 1 or Type 2 connection, though it’s unclear if the charging system has upgraded to support faster DC charging. The Leaf can only take a maximum of 44 kW DC fast-charging.

Those who are interested to buy one of these but don’t currently own a classic Mini, LEC will go the extra mile to source one for you. Each conversion takes approximately six weeks, but the current wait list is about six months for the UK alone (there are big orders from the US and Japan, too). The cost to run LEC-converted cars are predicted to be as little as five pence per mile.

The owner of the converted classic Mini said: “It’s everything I’ve ever wanted and more. Not only does my classic Mini have a new lease of life, but it’s perfect for running around London and so cheap to run! No more worrying if I’ve forgotten to pay the Congestion Charge and there are so many public charging points around. It really is a win-win.”

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