Volkswagen Will Take You to Taos for $24,190

Volkswagen has announced pricing for its upcoming smallest SUV, the 2022 Taos. Targeting entry-level SUV shoppers who may be priced  out of the Tiguan, Volkswagen will sell the Taos with a starting price of $24,190 (all prices include destination). The Taos will compete against a crowded field of other affordable small SUVs including the Chevrolet Trailblazer, Kia Seltos, Mazda CX-30 and Subaru Crosstrek.

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Here’s a quick look at each Taos trim level, including its starting price and standard equipment. All versions of the Taos use the same 158-horsepower, turbocharged 1.5-liter engine and are available with either front- or all-wheel drive. FWD versions will use an eight-speed automatic transmission and AWD versions a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic. 

Taos S: $24,190 (FWD)

The base Taos S comes standard with cloth upholstery, a 6.5-inch touchscreen multimedia display and an 8-inch digital instrument panel. It rides on standard 17-inch wheels; LED headlights, taillights and daytime running lights are also standard. Upgrading to AWD tacks on an additional $2,045 and will also add heated front seats, heated side mirrors and heated windshield washer nozzles. An optional $995 IQ.Drive S Package adds advanced safety tech including forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking and blind spot warning, lane-keeping assist and adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go, along with convenience features like rain-sensing wipers and a heated steering wheel.

Taos SE: $28,440 (FWD)

In the middle of the Taos lineup is the SE, which comes standard with 18-inch wheels, forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking and blind spot warning as well as an 8-inch touchscreen multimedia display with VW’s latest MIB3 system. Heated front seats (including an eight-way power driver’s seat), heated body-colored side mirrors and heated windshield washer nozzles are also standard. The SE also includes wireless cellphone charging and three USB-C charging ports; the upholstery is upgraded to a combination of cloth and faux leather. Upgrading to AWD in the SE will cost $1,450. Other options on the SE include a $1,200 panoramic sunroof, black 18-inch wheels for $395 and the $895 IQ.Drive SE Package. With the latter, the rest of the advanced driver assistance features that don’t come standard with the SE — lane-keeping assist, adaptive cruise control and more — are added, as are additional convenience features like rain-sensing wipers, a heated steering wheel and automatic high beams.

Taos SEL: $32,685 (FWD)

At the top of the Taos range is the SEL, which will be easily identifiable by its standard illuminated grille. It upgrades the in-car tech with a 10.25-inch digital instrument panel and 8-inch touchscreen with built-in navigation. FWD Taos SELs will ride on 18-inch black wheels, while the AWD version gets 19-inch machined-finish rims. Leather upholstery is standard and AWD models will also get ventilated front seats. Other standard comfort features include dual-zone automatic climate control, ambient lighting and an eight-speaker premium BeatsAudio stereo. Rain-sensing wipers and the heated steering wheel are also standard on the SEL, as is the IQ.Drive suite of advanced safety tech. Adding AWD will cost $1,555, and the panoramic sunroof is a $1,200 option.

What About Competitors?

With a starting price of over $24,000 for a base model, the 2022 Taos starts on the pricier side of vehicles in its class, though we don’t currently have model-year 2022 pricing for all of its competition. The 2021 Kia Seltos, 2021 Mazda CX-30 and 2021 Subaru Crosstrek all start at just over $23,000 and the 2022 Chevrolet Trailblazer starts under $23,000. Why compare those four? Model-year 2021 versions were the entrants in our most recent comparison test of affordable small SUVs, which the Seltos won.

Given the larger Tiguan’s repeat victories over compact SUVs in our testing, it will be interesting to get behind the wheel of the Taos and see if VW can continue its dominance on a slightly smaller scale.

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